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  #181  
Old 08-18-2004, 04:58 PM
dallee
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Re: Ptsd Issues

Good to see you are back and in better spirits Vic. Keep posting.
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  #182  
Old 08-18-2004, 05:22 PM
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Re: Ptsd Issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reconvic
Well I am back and doing a lot better then when I was here last. Just wanted to thanks everyone for the prayers. I was in the Phx. Va Hospital for a bit but got a better grip on life again . Thanks to all.
Semper Fi Vic

hey Vic, good to hear you are OK. how are the other issues we talked about when you left??

Hope all is ok. there also.
Dana
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  #183  
Old 08-19-2004, 12:17 PM
Reconvic
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Re: Ptsd Issues

AJ the other issues are still real hard on me. after 32 years of marriage it is hard to not have the one you love, return that love bro. I am having a very hard time with that but I guess that will pass too. Thks Bro Semper Fi. Vic
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  #184  
Old 08-19-2004, 03:21 PM
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Re: Ptsd Issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reconvic
AJ the other issues are still real hard on me. after 32 years of marriage it is hard to not have the one you love, return that love bro. I am having a very hard time with that but I guess that will pass too. Thks Bro Semper Fi. Vic
They say time heals all wounds, that maybe true. It doesn't take away memories. Only your inner strenght, believe in yourself and the strong believes in God shine thru.
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  #185  
Old 08-21-2004, 10:21 AM
Reconvic
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Cross Glow Sm Clr Re: Ptsd Issues

AJ you are right in many ways. Life goes on with the steath God gives us even when we feel everything is lost, we wake up and give thanks for that.
May the Lord help us all, beleive and he will.
S.F. Vic





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Originally Posted by ajusmc
They say time heals all wounds, that maybe true. It doesn't take away memories. Only your inner strenght, believe in yourself and the strong believes in God shine thru.
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  #186  
Old 08-21-2004, 11:19 AM
dallee
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Re: Ptsd Issues

God loves you Vic. We stand here as God's hands to hold you and to hold up. This is a time for you to draw closer to God. Allow yourself the pleasures that can come only from him. It is not required for you to suffer the pain of lonlieness. The holy spirit will bring you inside of the holy of holies where you can touch the very face of God. The joy that will overwhelm your soul is inexpressible. Enjoy this day in your Lord, Vic.
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  #187  
Old 08-21-2004, 04:21 PM
Trooper
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Re: Ptsd Issues

Vic

Your in our Prayers!

Psalm 100:4-5

Enter into His gates with thanksgiving,
And into His courts with praise.
Be thankful to Him, and bless His name.
For the LORD is good;
His mercy is everlasting,
And His truth endures to all generations.
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  #188  
Old 08-22-2004, 09:35 AM
Reconvic
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Cross Glow Lg Clr 2 Re: Ptsd Issues

I thank you all for your thoughts and prayers, life is hard at times, but this to shall pass. May the lord give us the strength to carry on.
Semper Fi Vic
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  #189  
Old 09-04-2004, 07:34 PM
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danausmc danausmc is offline
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Re: Ptsd Issues

Well we are back up and running.....
There was a technical problem with the site and we were down but not out.

There is a whole new generation of warriors coming home and will have the same issues as all the previous combatants since time inmemorial. Its time for us to get squared away a give a hand to our younger brothers and sisters and that is what this site is about.....not forgetting who we are or those that are still dealing with issues from the past, (including me.)

Someone asked me why I am so angry in another post......I been thinking about that ever since.

Want to re-visit anger or start a new discussion??


Im open for anything.

Dana
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  #190  
Old 09-05-2004, 10:37 AM
Reconvic
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Cross Glow Sm Clr Re: Ptsd Issues

Dana That was bothering me I couldn't get on the site and was worried it was on my end bro. I hope all my brothers here are doing fine. I am taking it day by day at this point in my life. My PTSD VA doctor is leaving so I will get another one soon I hope. My home life is pretty alone at this time, but at least I have my brothers here and at some other sites.Thanks to all for your prayers, May the Lord bless you all.
Semper FI Vic
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  #191  
Old 09-05-2004, 01:51 PM
Trooper
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Re: Ptsd Issues

Vic

Even though we weren't able to visit by Computer, doesn't mean we stop praying for each other. Telephone lines are available an an alternative. We're continually holding you up in prayer.
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  #192  
Old 09-06-2004, 11:35 AM
Reconvic
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Cross Glow Sm Clr Re: Ptsd Issues

Trooper; I cannot tell you what you all mean to me. You all talked me into seeking help at the VA before I did something stupid. I pray for all here and to those that need to learn of this site and are still lost as I was. I thank the Lord for his help each day to carry on. Bless you all.
Semper Fi Vic





Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper
Vic

Even though we weren't able to visit by Computer, doesn't mean we stop praying for each other. Telephone lines are available an an alternative. We're continually holding you up in prayer.
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  #193  
Old 09-06-2004, 06:17 PM
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Cross Glow Lg Clr 2 Re: Ptsd Issues

Vic

Brother I need you as much as you need me. As far as stupid mistakes go, that's what I majored in. We all need brothers to (in Love) slap us back in line.

Brother, not only are you Loved and respected, but your needed as well.
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  #194  
Old 01-12-2005, 07:26 PM
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Re: Ptsd Issues

Post Traumatic Stress:
The war may be over, but the battle has just begun ...


By Arikka Johnson
Army Flier Living Edito
Thursday, January 6, 2005


(Editor's Note: This article was originally published in the May 13, 2004, issues of the Army Flier.)

The sound coming from the back of the building - a low and rising whine - startles him, and he begins to search for his nuclear, biological and chemical kit. His adrenaline rushes just for a moment when he realizes where he is ... in a restaurant, eating dinner with his family. The sound is only the noise from a busy kitchen.

Would this be considered post traumatic stress disorder? Should this be considered a serious incident, even though it only occurred once or twice upon a Soldier's return from the war?

Maybe.

Maybe not.

But if this type of reaction, in addition to other symptoms, continues, the Soldier may be suffering and may need help.

Combat-related post traumatic stress disorder is one of many ways a veteran exhibits difficulties adjusting to normal life after experiencing war. Whenever an individual is exposed to a potentially traumatic experience, there is the potential for post traumatic stress. The chronic nature of these adjustment difficulties is what defines a PTSD sufferer.

Symptoms are varied, but distinct. According to Dr. MassI Wyatt, a doctor of behavioral medicine at the U.S. Army Aeromedical Center, PTSD can be diagnosed if a Soldier suffers a certain number of symptoms from each of three symptom groups: re-experiencing, avoidance/numbing and hyperarousal. To qualify for chronic PTSD, these symptoms will last more than a month and cause severe personal, interpersonal and/or professional distress.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, published by the American Psychiatric Association, re-experiencing would be defined as frequent, sudden and upsetting memories, including certain images and thoughts about the event.

Avoidance and numbing would be defined as feeling detached from family, friends and co-workers and making efforts to avoid talking, thinking and feeling about the traumatic event.

Hyperarousal would include such things as problems falling or staying asleep, outbursts of anger and irritability and feeling hyper-alert and easily startled. These symptoms may start to appear within several weeks of the traumatic event or the symptoms may lay latent for months or years and then show up after additional stressors arise.

People suffering from PTSD may exhibit signs of anxiety or even major depression. Physical symptoms, such as stomach pains, respiratory problems, headaches, muscular cramping, low back pain and cardiovascular problems may also challenge the sufferer. Substance abuse can also be a tell-tale sign of this disorder.

These symptoms can be caused by any number of experiences during a war. Being fired upon is only one of the many different severe stresses of the war zone, according to Wyatt.

"It is important to appreciate the various types of demands, stresses and potentially traumatizing events that war veterans may have experienced," said Wyatt. "Chronic PTSD can be caused by a number of experiences."

Combat exposure entails firing a weapon, being fired upon by enemy or friendly fire, or being witness to injury and death. Also, voluntarily going out on patrols, with these potential experiences awaiting, can cause severe stress.

The aftermath of battle, to include handling the dying, the dead and enemy Soldiers, and dealing with devastated communities and homeless refugees, can also contribute to the trauma experienced.

Anticipating potential exposure to NBC weapons, the difficulty of living and working in a war zone, concerns over family and other important issues can overtax a Soldier's coping mechanisms and leave him susceptible to post traumatic stress.

Many people will be able to handle the stress of the battlefield and go on to lead functional lives. Wyatt recommends those who cannot maintain normal responses to combat seek immediate treatment.

Treatment for PTSD must begin as soon as possible after combat in order to prevent a Soldier's life from degrading. The possibility of depression, substance abuse and other psychological problems will lead to PTSD if untreated. Medication, reconditioning strategies and support therapy can reduce the problems associated with post-traumatic trauma, and the quality of a Soldier's life can be restored.

"Intervening in areas of disfunction and providing an active support structure is vital," said Wyatt, "so that life can go on in a healthy manner."

According to the National Center for PTSD, education is the key to caring for a veteran suffering from the disorder. Educating the Soldier and his family and providing support through a trained clinician can often be a big part of the solution to post-traumatic stress reactions.

Training in coping strategies is an important component to successful treatment. According to Wyatt, learning how to accept and deal with the loss of control of emotions and responses to those emotions is useful and restores a Soldier's stress management skills.

"Anxiety management, breathing and relaxation training, emotional grounding, anger management and communication skills building all help empower the veteran," Wyatt said. Another component to treatment for PTSD is exposure therapy. This repeated verbalization of the traumatic events help to correct skewed perceptions of their personal trauma and strengthen the coping responses the Soldier is learning or relearning.

"Cognitive behavioral therapy," said Wyatt, "which means restructuring healthy emotional and behavioral patterns, identifying and resolving personal negative beliefs and developing new approaches to thinking about the traumatic event, may bring further stability to a Soldier's life after war."

The involvement of family, a Soldier's primary source of support, can exponentially increase the success of the other components of PTSD healthcare.

"Family acknowledgment and engagement can create breakthroughs in recovery," said Wyatt. "The involvement of a Soldier's family is vital to getting back to a normal life." The Family Advocacy program on Fort Rucker has many resources to aid in dealing with combat-related stress. Stella Davis, program manager, said that life's traumatic experiences can be overcome with recognizing the symptoms in oneself and others, seeking professional help and supporting community programs that help PTSD survivors and their families.

Working on preventative measures to reduce the number of people suffering from PTSD, the Army developed a program in 2003 to help Soldiers when redeploying from war operations.

"The Deployment Cycle Support Program is a multi-layered approach to support an individual's well-being and is designed to provide a smooth transition for Soldiers as they return home," said Wyatt. "Soldiers have access to individual reintegration training - briefings on everything from medical benefits to family reunification. Each Soldier will be assessed by professionals for further treatment, if needed."

"We offer reintegration training and support through our office as well," said Davis. "Group briefings occur whenever Fort Rucker Soldiers return from a combat deployment." Not every case of PTSD is combat related. Fort Rucker's Department of Behavioral Medicine treats anyone suffering from a traumatic event, from a person involved in a helicopter crash to a sexual assault victim. For further information, please call the Department of Behavioral Medicine at the USAAMC at 255-7028 or the Family Advocacy Program at 255-3898.

A combat stress support group meets every Wednesday at 3 p.m. at the DBM clinic at USAAMC. Army One Source also provides information and referrals for active duty Soldiers, Reservists, National Guardsmen and retirees. Go online to www.armyonesource.com or call 800-464-8107.


~The Agent Orange Quilt Of Tears~
As it was their job to defend our freedom,
So it becomes our job to honor their memories….RGS
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  #195  
Old 01-14-2005, 02:55 PM
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Blue Re: Ptsd Issues

SGT Duffy,

Anger-A lid? I totally agree with your last paragraph. The only god I ever saw in the jungle was the one flying the helo that got my ass out of the s__t when I needed it the most. I don't think our God new what the good old Uncle Sam had planned for us or he would have fired his a__ up.

Stickthrower
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  #196  
Old 02-21-2006, 01:24 PM
uscoincollector
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Re: Ptsd Issues

Hi everyone,

I am a U.S. Marine Corps Vietnam veteran with PTSD. It has been put upon my heart to write a book. It will be about dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder as it pertains to veterans returning from a war zone.

I am going to be putting a lot of stories from veterans in this book and would love to hear from any one who cares to contribute. If you don't want to post your story here, I perfectly well understand. You can just send me an e-mail at bob.dennison@sbcglobal.net. I assure you it will be held in the strictest of confidence and no names (with the exeption of first name) will ever appear in my book. The title of the book is 'making PEACE with yourself AFTER WAR". I have a lot of information on this topic, but now I need some REAL HARD-CORE stories from anyone who is willing to share their story with me.

Thank you and God bless,
Bob
Semper Fi


P.S. I am a sufferer from PTSD and have been since 1967, when I came home from Vietnam. I just didn't know it until recently. If you are not sure if you have it send me an email and I will tell you what to look for. The symptoms are rather easy to detect and it is very common to get. Over 200,000 Vietnam veterans are currently suffering from cronic PTSD, and many others, like me, don't even know about it.
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  #197  
Old 02-22-2006, 05:57 AM
Don Dodson Don Dodson is offline
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Re: Ptsd Issues

Bob / uscoincollector:

Welcome to Point Man chat! May God lead your editing to share His good news, as He has graced many PTSD endurers. (I decided we should be "endurers" not "sufferers," since Our Lord told us we WILL have suffering on this earth; our job is to endure in faith until that Day of our total healing.) There are a lot of great secular methods to reduce the impact of PTSD and sometimes the important role of God The Healer is overlooked. I pray your endeavor brings you in touch with many who will be blessed by your work. WELCOME HOME!

Don "Oboeman" Dodson
Vietnam 1969-1970
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  #198  
Old 02-23-2006, 11:26 AM
Stickthrower
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Bounce Re: Ptsd Issues

Bob,
Reference your book. I don't know that I could talk or write about my experiences to you. PTSD has cost me my career in the Army as well as civiliam life, and just may end up costing me my wife.

There is nothing in this world that I would not do for a fellow Combat Vet to help him/her readjust or deal with PTSD.

But, I lived in the past for 30+ years and it has just about destroyed me as it has many others. Like Reconvic stated: It was hard enough talking to a doctor, other vets at Pointman, etc. I don't think I would be up to reliving the experiences all over again for someones pleasure reading. The toll taken on my life that would exist/reappear for someones reading pleasure is just to great a cost. I'm just getting my life back on track with the Lord and I don't need the added stress.

I don't know if you have done any research here in reading past posts, but you should. It will give you a feeling for what we have gone through, and still do on a daily basis, in attempting to readjust to a "normal" lifestyle, or as normal as we will probably ever get.

Chuck Dean has an excellent book on vets dealing or attempting to deal with PTSD and if you have not read NAM VET I highly suggest you do read it several times.

If I can ever help you in any other way please feel free to contact me on this site or PM me.
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  #199  
Old 10-28-2010, 04:42 PM
Grandmom Grandmom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lydiane View Post
I am the wife of a Vietnam veteran. One of the problems we women have with our vets is that they do not want to discuss Post Traumatic Stress issues UNLESS they have already accepted the reality of their PTSD . . . AND they are willing to work for a more tranquil life. It's hard to talk about it because talking often means triggers and NO ONE wants to go there!! I'm really proud of you guys for starting this forum. It will help both vets and their spouses. We'll just have to be patient while the momentum builds. Peace be with you all.
We've been dealing with this all by ourselves since my husband came home from Nam in 1971. No help from the VA. he tried since 1972 to get help, nothing. they just kept telling him there were no medical records for him being in Nam. Fianlly last year, we got VA to listen, he got 40% Disability, only retro to 2009. Forget all of the years he'd tried to get help.
He's struggled for years with anger. Myself and our 3 girls dealt with his anger also.
Since being diagnosed with Glioblastoma Multiforme Stage 4 Brain Cancer in March 2010, alot of memories are coming out. He's not angry, more emotional and that's not the person we've known all of these years.
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